‘Blood Red’ Rain Falls In India People Are Freaking Out

truther 4
  • Why are people panicking as their courtyards fill with “mysterious blood red rain“?
  • Did Nostradamus and others predict “rain like blood”?
  • Has this happened before?
  • What causes the red color in the mysterious rain?
  • Is it caused by an unidentified life form?
  • Could dust from a meteor affect an area more than a decade later?
  • Is all this just coincidence?

On Thursday, July 5, 2012, around 6:50 p.m. local time, a mysterious red rain shower fell for about 15 minutes in Kannur, Kerala, India. Locales within a one kilometer area in the Indian state of Kerala experienced this phenomenon, as it filled courtyards with blood red rain and stained people’s clothes pink.

Godfrey Louis, Ph.D. and Santosh Kumar hypothesize, "The red cells found in the red rain in Kerala are considered as a possible case of extraterrestrial life form."
Godfrey Louis, Ph.D. and Santosh Kumar hypothesize, “The red cells found in the red rain in Kerala are considered as a possible case of extraterrestrial life form.”
Photo credit:
Courtesy of Louis & Kumar

Nostradamus, Century 2, Quatrain 46
After a great misery for mankind an even greater approaches. The great cycle of the centuries is renewed: It will rain blood, milk, famine, war and disease.In the sky will be seen a fire, dragging a tail of sparks.

Kannur block panchayat President Shaija M collected a sample of the mysterious red rainwater. It was dark and had the smell of raw beetroot. His first thought was that an animal had been killed and its blood had mixed with the rainwater in the courtyard.

However, this is not the first time this “mysterious red rain” has fallen in the state of Kerala. Actually, it has been reported several times during the past decade.

  • From July 25 to September 23, 2001, this mysterious “blood red rain” sporadically fell in heavy downpours in Kerala.
  • In summer of 2006, the mysterious red rains fell a second time and gained widespread attention.

Initially, it was thought that the mysterious red rains were colored by fallout from a meteor burst, while a study commissioned by the Indian Government concluded that the rains had been colored by airborne spores from locally prolific terrestrial algae.

Two scientists, Godfrey Louis, Ph.D. and Santhosh Kumar of the Mahatma Gandhi University in Kottayam, proposed a controversial hypothesis, “The mysterious red color in the rain is caused by unidentified life form that does not have DNA.”

In August 2008, they presented their case at an astrobiology conference:

“The red cells found in the red rain in Kerala, India are now considered as a possible case of extraterrestrial life form. The molecular composition of these cells is yet to be identified.”

However, Louis and Kumar have not yet been explained how dust from a meteor could continue to fall over the same area – despite changing climatic conditions and wind patterns – for not only a couple of months, but for more than a decade

The Kerala red rain phenomenon was a blood rain (red rain) event and also occurred from July 25 to September 23, 2001, when red-colored rain sporadically fell on the southern Indian state of Kerala. Heavy downpours occurred in which the rain was colored red, staining clothes pink. Yellow, green, and black rain was also reported. Colored rain had been reported in Kerala as early as 1896 and several times since then.

The red rain that fell over Kerala, India in 2001 and the vast quantity of orange particulates that were washed ashore on August 3 2011 in Kivalina, Alaska are beginning to show remarkable parallels.  The remote village Kivalina in NW Alaska (68N, 164W) was invaded by an orange goo on August 3, 2011, first from the sea, and then from the sky. Right: close-up image of deposit.

Photo of the orange rain in /Alaska.

It was initially thought that the rains were colored by fallout from a hypothetical meteor burst, but a study commissioned by the Government of India concluded that the rains had been colored by airborne spores from locally prolific terrestrial algae.

 An extraterrestrial source cannot be excluded on the evidence available to date, according to a paper by noted physicist Chandra Wickramasinghe.

The remote village Kivalina in NW Alaska (68N, 164W) was invaded by an orange goo on August 3, 2011, first from the sea, and then from the sky. Right: close-up image of deposit.

Microscope images of red rain cells from 2001 (Left) and Kivalina goo (Right) from 2011

Researchers Wickramasinghe and Fred Hoyle have also used their data to argue in favor of intelligent design, and propose that the first life on Earth began in space, spreading through the universe via panspermia, and that evolution on earth is influenced by a steady influx of viruses arriving via comets.

In a 2010 paper they suggest that these organisms are of extraterrestrial origin and conclude: “Once again the Universe gives the appearance of being biologically constructed, and on this occasion on a truly vast scale. Once again those who consider such thoughts to be too outlandish to be taken seriously will continue to do so. While we ourselves shall continue to take the view that those who believe they can match the complexities of the Universe by simple experiments in their laboratories will continue to be disappointed.”

Electron micrographs of Kivalina cells distributed to media by the Nat ional Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USA. Left: object resembling fungal spore. Right: enlargement of spines on the sporSome thought this was the cause of the red rain.

(Courtesy of S.Morton)

Electron Microscope Image  of Kerala red rain cell in 2001 with daughter cells expelled from the interior

(Courtesy of G. Rajkumar)

Wickramasinghe is a Staff Member of the Institute of Astronomy at the University of Cambridge. There he began his pioneering work on the nature of Interstellar Dust, publishing many papers in this field that led to important paradigm shifts in astronomy. He published the very first definitive book on Interstellar Grains in 1967. In 1973 he was awarded Cambridge University’s highest doctorate for Science, the prestigious ScD.

Chandra Wickramasinghe is acknowledged as being one of the world’s leading experts on interstellar material and the origins of life. He has made many important contributions in this field, publishing over 350 papers in major scientific journals, over 75 in the high-impact journal Nature. In 1974 he first proposed the theory that dust in interstellar space and in comets was largely organic, a theory that has now been vindicated. Jointly with the late Sir Fred Hoyle he was awarded the International Dag Hammarskjold Gold Medal for Science in 1986

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4 Comments »

  1. Michael Cook July 17, 2012 at 2:43 am - Reply

    Tumeric cloud burst, with a touch of red chilli sauce, currying its way down to earth with an extra helping of basmati rice.

  2. owais July 16, 2012 at 10:45 pm - Reply

    we have to help burma , now where is UN and US

  3. kev July 16, 2012 at 8:24 pm - Reply

    Probably caused by all the Indian rubbish dumping they allow. My friend went to India & he said that it is filthy as people urinate & poo in the streets, so it makes you wonder what they do with their industrial toxic waste.

    • Ashu-ley August 12, 2012 at 2:47 am - Reply

      ya but what about france or the red river in iraq…………

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