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Conspiracy craze: why 12 million Americans believe alien lizards rule us

Conspiracy craze: why 12 million Americans believe alien lizards rule us

Around 66 million Americans believe that aliens landed at Roswell, New MexicoPhotograph: The Ronald Grant ArchivePsychologists are trying to determine why otherwise rational individuals can make the leap from “prudent paranoia” to illogical conspiracy theories By Olga Oksman via The Guardian According to a Public Policy Polling survey, around 12 million people in the US believe that interstellar lizards in people suits rule our country. We imported that particular belief from across the pond, where professional conspiracy theorist David Icke has long maintained that the Queen of England is a blood-drinking, shape-shifting alien. Conspiracy theories in general are not necessary bad, according to psychologists who study them. “If we were all completely trusting, it would not be good for survival,” explains Rob Brotherton, an academic psychologist and author of Suspicious Minds: Why We Believe Conspiracy Theories. “Sometimes people really don’t have our best interests in mind.” But when people leap from thinking their boss is trying to undermine them to believing their boss might be a secret lizard person, they probably cross from what psychologists refer to as “prudent paranoia” into illogical territory. And there are a lot of illogical ideas to pick from. Around 66 million Americans believe that aliens landed at Roswell, New Mexico; around 22 million people believe that the government faked the moon landing; and around 160 million believe that there is a conspiracy surrounding the assassination of former US president John F Kennedy. While aliens and fake moon landings probably trigger eyerolls in many of us, defining what constitutes a conspiracy theory is difficult, Brotherton says. The government, for example, does sometimes conspire to do the unspeakable, such as the infamous 1930s Tuskegee study, initiated by the US government to examine untreated syphilis in African-American men. Researchers blocked research participants from receiving penicillin or exiting the experiment to get treatment. The study continued until a media report made it public. In this case, believing that the government was conspiring to keep people sick would have been completely accurate.David Icke is a well-known political commentator and proponent of the theory that human civilization descended from reptilians in the constellation Draco.There are characteristics that help differentiate a conspiracy theory from prudent paranoia, Brotherton says. Conspiracy theories tend to depend on conspirators who are unduly evil, he explains, with genocide or world domination as a motive. Conspiracy theories also tend to assign an usually high level of competency to the conspirators, Brotherton adds, pointing out that when the government really does “shady stuff” it often isn’t able to keep it secret. Chances are, we all know someone who believes some version of a conspiracy theory, which is why psychologists have been trying to understand what makes someone jump from logically questioning the world to looking for signs of lizard teeth in public figures. Research has shown that feelings of powerlessness and uncertainty are associated with a tendency to believe in conspiracies, says Karen Douglas, professor of social psychology at the University of Kent in the UK. Or as Joseph E Uscinski, associate professor of political science at the University of Miami and author of American Conspiracy Theories, puts it, “conspiracies are for losers”. Continue Reading @ The Guardian – – –Like this: Like Loading…RelatedSource link
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Five Facts Natural News Got Wrong About Aspartame

Five Facts Natural News Got Wrong About Aspartame

By Myles Power (powerm1985) Filed under: Debunk, Educational, GMO, Health, Medical, Pseudoscientific, Science Tagged: alcohol dehydrogenase, amino acid, artificial sweetener, artificial sweeteners, aspartame, aspartic acid, Autism, brain damage, Cancer, E coli bacteria, feces, Formaldehyde, genetically modified, GMO, metabolic syndrome, methanol, methanol oxidized, Myles Power, Natural News, NaturalNews, obesity, poison, saccharin, saccharine, sodium saccharin, Spartan, sucrose, sugar, toxicity, youtubeSource link
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Finally an Honest Reporter! Tammy Bruce Puts Blame on Violent Leftist Thugs at Trump Rally – YouTube

Finally an Honest Reporter! Tammy Bruce Puts Blame on Violent Leftist Thugs at Trump Rally – YouTube

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The ethics of conspiracy theories

The ethics of conspiracy theories

Source: The Minefield – ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) Claims that the Moon landing was faked or that lizard people are taking over the world might seem harmless and even humorous, but philosopher Patrick Stokes argues that every conspiracy theory comes with a moral cost.The Space Shuttle Challenger explodes shortly after lifting off from Kennedy Space Center, Fla., Tuesday, Jan. 28, 1986. All seven crew members died in the explosion. (AP Photo/Bruce Weaver)Earlier this year, the world marked the 30th anniversary of the Challenger space shuttle disaster and the loss of all seven crew. With the public captivated by the story of Christa McAuliffe, the first teacher in space, some 17 per cent of the entire American population watched in horror as Challenger exploded live on television. Except it didn’t really happen. The tragedy was faked. At least six of the astronauts are alive and well and hiding in plain sight. Why, they’re even still using their real names, or variations thereof. Sharon Christa McAuliffe is now Sharon A. McAuliffe, an adjunct professor of law at Syracuse University. The public has been duped by a massive conspiracy for three decades, one finally exposed thanks to intrepid amateur sleuths scouring the internet for clues. These claims are, needless to say, utter hogwash; the evidence offered is not merely flimsy, but laughable. (At least two of the people alleged to be Challenger survivors are actually siblings of Challenger crewmembers). And what sort of conspirators would fake their own deaths in front of millions of viewers but then keep their real names? Even so, it’s yet another illustration of the pervasiveness of conspiracy theory as a social practice—and the widespread desire to believe in them. If you think this all sounds like some fringe belief that nobody could buy into, consider this: for this theory to hold, NASA would have had to somehow keep a conspiracy involving thousands of people secret for three decades. Yet upwards of 6 per cent of Americans believe that NASA pulled off the far greater feat of faking the moon landings. Continue Reading @ ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) – – –Like this: Like Loading…RelatedSource link
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Chemtrails Chemicals Disfiguring People Worldwide

Chemtrails Chemicals Disfiguring People Worldwide

Reports are coming in from around the world of chemical chemtrail cocktails disfiguring peoples faces. People are being warned not to go outside when there are clouds in the sky, not to take unnecessary journeys. Peter from Chicago (pictured below) only went outside for a mere 30 seconds and this is the result. Peter sent us in his selfie immediately after being exposed to the chemtrails chemical cocktail which apparently contained gooey semen. Top Scientists are unsure whether it was human or pig semen.Jamima from San Francisco who works at a Mc Donalds drive through only peeked outside her service window for 2-3 seconds to take an order from a customer. As you can see (below) the results are horrific. Jamima will be out of work for at least 2 weeks due to the chemtrail exposure and is suing  secret society “THEY” or “THEM” for loss of earnings. Pipa from Sydney Australia…Source link
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The Fermi Paradox: Where are the aliens?

The Fermi Paradox: Where are the aliens?

By Stuff They Don’t Want You to Know via YouTubeLike this: Like Loading…RelatedPosted in: Aliens, Conspiracy, Cover-up, Creatures, Government | Tagged: Aliens, Burmese paradox, Conspiracy, Cover up, cover-ups, coverup, Enrico Fermi, extraterrestrial, Fermi Paradox, government, Interstellar travel, John Abel, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Stuff They Don’t Want You to Know, youtubeSource link
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Firestorm in Waco

Firestorm in Waco

How much truth is there to the conspiracy theories that the FBI deliberately killed the Branch Davidians? By Brian Dunning via skeptoidRead transcript below or listen here Today we’re going to delve into the deepest, ugliest corner of urban legendry: conspiracy theories claiming that the US government deliberately attacks and kills its own citizens. In this case it’s the infamous 1993 raid on the Branch Davidian religious sect near Waco, Texas resulting in the deaths of some 75 people inside. The accepted narrative is that the Davidians, intent on apocalyptic death according to their prophecies, committed mass suicide as the federal agents entered the compound with armored vehicles; while the conspiracy theory holds that it was the federal agents who set the fires in a successful effort to murder the entire population inside. Today we’re going to examine the claim, and find out how we know what we know.The Mount Carmel complex burns in Waco, April 19, 1993The Branch Davidian sect, originally an offshoot of the Seventh Day Adventist Church, had been on its land outside Waco for nearly 60 years when young Vernon Howell took it over in the aftermath of a 1987 armed raid. He luckily escaped conviction, changed his name to David Koresh (telling his followers that Koresh meant “death”), and assumed the role of prophet. A few years later, a confrontation with federal authorities led to a six week siege that ended with the complete destruction by fire of the compound as tanks rolled in with tear gas, killing Koresh and 75 other Branch Davidians inside. The conspiracy theories came thick and fast. The most prominent were popularized by a pair of independent filmmakers, Linda Thompson (who was a full-throttle conspiracy theorist best known for her film Waco: The Big Lie) and Mike McNulty (who was more measured, and received an Academy Award nomination for Waco: The Rules of Engagement). We’ll take a look at the two most commonly repeated claims: Brian Dunning via Continue Reading @ Skeptoid – – –Like this: Like Loading…RelatedPosted in: Conspiracy, Cults, Government, Religion | Tagged: Branch Davidian, Brian Dunning, conspiracy theories, David Koresh, Davidians, government, Linda Thompson, Mike McNulty, prophet, Seventh-day Adventist Church, skeptoid, Texas, Vernon Howell, Waco, Waco: The Big Lie, Waco: The Rules of EngagementSource link
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Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Conspiracies

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Conspiracies

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The Story Behind the Crop Circle Phenomenon

The Story Behind the Crop Circle Phenomenon

By Karl Smallwood via todayifoundout In 1991 two men by the name of Doug Bower and Dave Chorley rocked the worlds of ufologists and paranormal experts alike when they claimed to be the driving force behind the crop circle phenomenon of the late 1970s and beyond using little more than a plank of wood and a length of rope. This was a claim self-professed experts on the phenomenon dismissed as ludicrous, until the two men showed everyone how they did it. Flanked by members of the press from across the world, in a small field in Warminster, the two men proceeded to methodically push over wheat using wood planks. A few hours later, they stood in the middle of a crop circle so perfect actual aliens armed with a Spirograph would have struggled to make one that looked any better. The men then explained to the waiting cameras that they’d been making crop circles this way for well over a decade, starting in 1976, shortly before similar looking crop circles suddenly started cropping up in other areas of the world. According to Chorley and Bower, the decision to first start flattening wheat in 1976 was inspired by two things- a story Bower had heard while living in Australia about mysterious circles appearing in sugarcane fields, and a few too many pints of beer. In regards to the former, Bower was referring to a series of large circular patterns that appeared in fields in Tully, Queensland in the mid to late 1960s. Unlike modern crop circles which often feature amazingly complex patterns and uniform pressing of crops, the Tully Saucer Nests were simple, somewhat crude circles of destruction. Ufologists have long maintained that these circles were caused by UFO’s landing and subsequently taking off, hence the name “Tully Saucer Nests”. The more accepted alternate theory is that they were simply caused by whirlwinds touching down briefly. Whatever the case, after Bower moved back to England, the two men became friends over a mutual appreciation of art and their favourite hobby- watercolor painting. They eventually began a weekly tradition of meeting for a few drinks on a Friday evening at the Percy Hobbs pub in nearby Winchester. One day in 1976, they decided to have their usual drinks outside and noticed the acres of pristine wheat surrounding them, which is when Bower recalled the story he’d once told Chorley of the mysterious circles that had baffled experts in Australia. With a glint in his eye, Bower turned to his friend and said, “How would you like a bit of a laugh?” Continue Reading @ todayifoundout – – –Like this: Like Loading…RelatedPosted in: Aliens, Crop Circles, Educational, Mysteries, UFO | Tagged: Aliens, Bower, Chorley, Crop circle, Dave Chorley, Doug Bower, Karl Smallwood, paranormal, todayifoundout, UFOlogistsSource link
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Monsanto Vs. The World

Monsanto Vs. The World

By Myles Power (YouTube) Filed under: GMO Tagged: aspartame, GMO, Monsanto, Myles, Myles Power, youtubeSource link
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Fake Psychics Scam Billions

Fake Psychics Scam Billions

by Steven Novella via NeuroLogica Blog I know, it’s redundant. All psychics are fake and a scam, but some are worse than others.Why don’t you remember this headline?When most people think of psychics they conjure an image (see what I did there) of someone dressed in robes in a mystically decorated parlor who reads your palm or the tarot cards for $40. They are making a meager living giving people a bit of harmless entertainment. Some may actually think they have powers, some may know it’s all an act, but what’s the harm? In truth, however, many psychics are predators who scam people out of hundreds, thousands, even tens of thousands of dollars. They prey on the vulnerable and the desperate and can ruin lives. This is not a benign industry. A recent report from Toronto is just one of many – a steady stream with no expectation of ending. They report stories of people who have been victimized by psychics promising to turn around their fortunes, while parasitically bleeding them of as much money as possible.  How the scam works Encounters usually begin like any street-corner psychic, with a simple reading. Everyone who comes in for a reading is a potential mark. The more desperate the better. Such psychics (I am just going to use the term “psychic” for convenience, but assume the usual caveats – alleged, fake, etc.) are adept at creating the illusion that they have some magical insight. They are, after all, just mentalists, and usually not very good ones. They don’t really have to be, as their audience wants to believe, often desperately. Their primary tool is the cold reading. This is the technique of listening to what your mark says, then feeding it back to them as if it came to you magically. You can also make vague statements that are likely to apply to most people, then following up when you get a positive reaction, while glossing over any misses. Simple observation also plays a role. A willing target will do most of the hard work, making all the connections in their own mind. This can seem quite impressive to someone naive to the technique – in fact a skilled mentalist can seem impressive even to someone familiar with it. This is all part of the grooming, drawing the mark in and gaining their confidence. This is, after all, a confidence game. Once you believe that the psychic has the magical power to fix your life, you are lost. They then use a variety of tricks to bleed their marks of all their money. They may use some slight of hand, like pretending the water their mark gargled is full of insects, or an egg used in a seeing is full of black ichor. They try to convince their mark that they are cursed, and that the psychic has the power to lift the curse. This frequently involves praying over cash, gift cards, or other untraceable items of value – items the mark never sees again. In one case a psychic scammed a business man whose girlfriend died unexpectedly out of $700,000. Continue Reading @ NeuroLogica Blog – – –Like this: Like Loading…RelatedSource link
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Got a Story? Submit A Story!

Got a Story? Submit A Story!

Do you know where to find a good story?Why not submit it to us? To submit a story click the image above or send an email to tips@illuminuti.com and include a web link URL to the story. Please note: tips@illuminuti.com is a one-way email address. It’s set up to receive emails but it’s NOT setup to send emails, so a response should not be expected.Mason I. Bilderberg (MIB)Like this: Like Loading…RelatedPosted in: Brain Works, ChemClouds, ChemTrails, Conspiracy, Debunk, Educational, ESP, Fun Stuff, GMO, Human Perception, Paranormal, Pseudoscientific, Psychology, Quackery, Satire, Science, Secret Societies, Skepticism, Superstition, Urban Legends | Tagged: conspiracists, Conspiracy, conspiracy theories, conspiracy theorist, conspiracy theorists, conspiracy theory, debunk, Debunked, ET, Extra Terrestrials, Illuminati, illuminuti, illuminutti, New World Order, News Tip, Paranoid Conspiracy Theorists, paranormal, pseudoscience, psychic, Psychology, science, skeptic, skepticism, skeptics, Story, Story Tip, Submit, Submit A Story, Tip, Unidentified flying objectSource link
0
Fake Psychics Scam Billions

Fake Psychics Scam Billions

by Steven Novella via NeuroLogica Blog I know, it’s redundant. All psychics are fake and a scam, but some are worse than others.Why don’t you remember this headline?When most people think of psychics they conjure an image (see what I did there) of someone dressed in robes in a mystically decorated parlor who reads your palm or the tarot cards for $40. They are making a meager living giving people a bit of harmless entertainment. Some may actually think they have powers, some may know it’s all an act, but what’s the harm? In truth, however, many psychics are predators who scam people out of hundreds, thousands, even tens of thousands of dollars. They prey on the vulnerable and the desperate and can ruin lives. This is not a benign industry. A recent report from Toronto is just one of many – a steady stream with no expectation of ending. They report stories of people who have been victimized by psychics promising to turn around their fortunes, while parasitically bleeding them of as much money as possible.  How the scam works Encounters usually begin like any street-corner psychic, with a simple reading. Everyone who comes in for a reading is a potential mark. The more desperate the better. Such psychics (I am just going to use the term “psychic” for convenience, but assume the usual caveats – alleged, fake, etc.) are adept at creating the illusion that they have some magical insight. They are, after all, just mentalists, and usually not very good ones. They don’t really have to be, as their audience wants to believe, often desperately. Their primary tool is the cold reading. This is the technique of listening to what your mark says, then feeding it back to them as if it came to you magically. You can also make vague statements that are likely to apply to most people, then following up when you get a positive reaction, while glossing over any misses. Simple observation also plays a role. A willing target will do most of the hard work, making all the connections in their own mind. This can seem quite impressive to someone naive to the technique – in fact a skilled mentalist can seem impressive even to someone familiar with it. This is all part of the grooming, drawing the mark in and gaining their confidence. This is, after all, a confidence game. Once you believe that the psychic has the magical power to fix your life, you are lost. They then use a variety of tricks to bleed their marks of all their money. They may use some slight of hand, like pretending the water their mark gargled is full of insects, or an egg used in a seeing is full of black ichor. They try to convince their mark that they are cursed, and that the psychic has the power to lift the curse. This frequently involves praying over cash, gift cards, or other untraceable items of value – items the mark never sees again. In one case a psychic scammed a business man whose girlfriend died unexpectedly out of $700,000. Continue Reading @ NeuroLogica Blog – – –Like this: Like Loading…RelatedSource link
0
Remember to visit us on Facebook!

Remember to visit us on Facebook!

Filed under: Uncategorized Tagged: additional content, Facebook, illuminutti, visitSource link
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Monsanto Vs. The World

Monsanto Vs. The World

By Myles Power (YouTube) Filed under: GMO Tagged: aspartame, GMO, Monsanto, Myles, Myles Power, youtubeSource link
0
The Story Behind the Crop Circle Phenomenon

The Story Behind the Crop Circle Phenomenon

By Karl Smallwood via todayifoundout In 1991 two men by the name of Doug Bower and Dave Chorley rocked the worlds of ufologists and paranormal experts alike when they claimed to be the driving force behind the crop circle phenomenon of the late 1970s and beyond using little more than a plank of wood and a length of rope. This was a claim self-professed experts on the phenomenon dismissed as ludicrous, until the two men showed everyone how they did it. Flanked by members of the press from across the world, in a small field in Warminster, the two men proceeded to methodically push over wheat using wood planks. A few hours later, they stood in the middle of a crop circle so perfect actual aliens armed with a Spirograph would have struggled to make one that looked any better. The men then explained to the waiting cameras that they’d been making crop circles this way for well over a decade, starting in 1976, shortly before similar looking crop circles suddenly started cropping up in other areas of the world. According to Chorley and Bower, the decision to first start flattening wheat in 1976 was inspired by two things- a story Bower had heard while living in Australia about mysterious circles appearing in sugarcane fields, and a few too many pints of beer. In regards to the former, Bower was referring to a series of large circular patterns that appeared in fields in Tully, Queensland in the mid to late 1960s. Unlike modern crop circles which often feature amazingly complex patterns and uniform pressing of crops, the Tully Saucer Nests were simple, somewhat crude circles of destruction. Ufologists have long maintained that these circles were caused by UFO’s landing and subsequently taking off, hence the name “Tully Saucer Nests”. The more accepted alternate theory is that they were simply caused by whirlwinds touching down briefly. Whatever the case, after Bower moved back to England, the two men became friends over a mutual appreciation of art and their favourite hobby- watercolor painting. They eventually began a weekly tradition of meeting for a few drinks on a Friday evening at the Percy Hobbs pub in nearby Winchester. One day in 1976, they decided to have their usual drinks outside and noticed the acres of pristine wheat surrounding them, which is when Bower recalled the story he’d once told Chorley of the mysterious circles that had baffled experts in Australia. With a glint in his eye, Bower turned to his friend and said, “How would you like a bit of a laugh?” Continue Reading @ todayifoundout – – –Like this: Like Loading…RelatedPosted in: Aliens, Crop Circles, Educational, Mysteries, UFO | Tagged: Aliens, Bower, Chorley, Crop circle, Dave Chorley, Doug Bower, Karl Smallwood, paranormal, todayifoundout, UFOlogistsSource link
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Got a Story? Submit A Story!

Got a Story? Submit A Story!

Do you know where to find a good story?Why not submit it to us? To submit a story click the image above or send an email to tips@illuminuti.com and include a web link URL to the story. Please note: tips@illuminuti.com is a one-way email address. It’s set up to receive emails but it’s NOT setup to send emails, so a response should not be expected.Mason I. Bilderberg (MIB)Like this: Like Loading…RelatedPosted in: Brain Works, ChemClouds, ChemTrails, Conspiracy, Debunk, Educational, ESP, Fun Stuff, GMO, Human Perception, Paranormal, Pseudoscientific, Psychology, Quackery, Satire, Science, Secret Societies, Skepticism, Superstition, Urban Legends | Tagged: conspiracists, Conspiracy, conspiracy theories, conspiracy theorist, conspiracy theorists, conspiracy theory, debunk, Debunked, ET, Extra Terrestrials, Illuminati, illuminuti, illuminutti, New World Order, News Tip, Paranoid Conspiracy Theorists, paranormal, pseudoscience, psychic, Psychology, science, skeptic, skepticism, skeptics, Story, Story Tip, Submit, Submit A Story, Tip, Unidentified flying objectSource link
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Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Conspiracies

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Conspiracies

Filed under: Comedy, Conspiracy, False Flag, Fun Stuff, Humor Tagged: cadbury creme eggs, conspiracies, conspiracist, conspiracy theories, conspiracy theory, John Oliver, Sheeple, youtubeSource link
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Firestorm in Waco

Firestorm in Waco

How much truth is there to the conspiracy theories that the FBI deliberately killed the Branch Davidians? By Brian Dunning via skeptoidRead transcript below or listen here Today we’re going to delve into the deepest, ugliest corner of urban legendry: conspiracy theories claiming that the US government deliberately attacks and kills its own citizens. In this case it’s the infamous 1993 raid on the Branch Davidian religious sect near Waco, Texas resulting in the deaths of some 75 people inside. The accepted narrative is that the Davidians, intent on apocalyptic death according to their prophecies, committed mass suicide as the federal agents entered the compound with armored vehicles; while the conspiracy theory holds that it was the federal agents who set the fires in a successful effort to murder the entire population inside. Today we’re going to examine the claim, and find out how we know what we know.The Mount Carmel complex burns in Waco, April 19, 1993The Branch Davidian sect, originally an offshoot of the Seventh Day Adventist Church, had been on its land outside Waco for nearly 60 years when young Vernon Howell took it over in the aftermath of a 1987 armed raid. He luckily escaped conviction, changed his name to David Koresh (telling his followers that Koresh meant “death”), and assumed the role of prophet. A few years later, a confrontation with federal authorities led to a six week siege that ended with the complete destruction by fire of the compound as tanks rolled in with tear gas, killing Koresh and 75 other Branch Davidians inside. The conspiracy theories came thick and fast. The most prominent were popularized by a pair of independent filmmakers, Linda Thompson (who was a full-throttle conspiracy theorist best known for her film Waco: The Big Lie) and Mike McNulty (who was more measured, and received an Academy Award nomination for Waco: The Rules of Engagement). We’ll take a look at the two most commonly repeated claims: Brian Dunning via Continue Reading @ Skeptoid – – –Like this: Like Loading…RelatedPosted in: Conspiracy, Cults, Government, Religion | Tagged: Branch Davidian, Brian Dunning, conspiracy theories, David Koresh, Davidians, government, Linda Thompson, Mike McNulty, prophet, Seventh-day Adventist Church, skeptoid, Texas, Vernon Howell, Waco, Waco: The Big Lie, Waco: The Rules of EngagementSource link
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