The Sunday Times ‘crossed a red line,’ says Ambassador to UK Daniel Taub; Knesset Speaker Rivlin lodges complaint with British counterpart

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Between BBC’s reporter Tim Wilcox asking live on TV about the suffering of the Palestinians at the hands of Israel, which he has now apologized for, and this latest BBC cartoon, I wonder if the BBC and/or the UK will be the next target for a Mossad style Israeli False Flag Attack, just like France was for their support of Palestine. Or maybe like Malaysia, after their support of Palestine, planes started dropping out of the sky.

The Sunday Times ‘crossed a red line,’ says Ambassador to UK Daniel Taub; Knesset Speaker Rivlin lodges complaint with British counterpart

  What are the odds that three of its passenger airliners would fall out of the sky – all under mysterious, even bizarre circumstances – in one year? OR…

“Just one month ago, France set off a stampede when its lower house voted to recognize Palestine. Now Palestine is in the International Criminal Court, poised to take down Israel for genocide.
Suddenly “Islamic terror strikes France.” Is Paris being punished for its pro-Palestine vote?
In late 2013, Malaysia’s Kuala Lumpur Tribunal found Israel guilty of genocide. A few months later, Malaysian planes started falling out of the sky.
In 2011, Norway’s Labor Party’s youth wing was poised to impose a complete blockade on Israel. Suddenly the entire leadership of the Party’s youth wing was slaughtered in a professional operation falsely attributed to a lone nut, Anders Breivik….”

Do we see a pattern of revenge? A pattern of murder? Mossad – By way of deception, thou shalt do war!

Why would Muslims attack the very people and countries brave enough to stand up to Israel and support them in the first place?

“Israel is planning to demand an apology for a controversial cartoon that appeared in the British Sunday Times, Israel’s ambassador to London said Monday, while one minister mulled steps against the paper.

One day after the caricature sparked outrage among Jewish groups for its depiction of a bloodthirsty Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu building a wall with the blood and bodies of Palestinians, leading Israelis joined the chorus of condemnation.

“The newspaper should apologize for this. We’re not going to let this stand as it is,” Israeli Ambassador to London Daniel Taub told The Times of Israel in a telephone interview. “We genuinely think that a red line has been crossed and the obligation on the newspaper is to correct that.”

Taub added that he was going to meet with the newspaper’s editor “at the earliest opportunity, perhaps already today,” to express the government’s concern about a cartoon that draws “on classical anti-Semitic themes.”

In a meeting Monday with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Tony Blair, the representative of the Middle East quartet who’s also a former British premier, deplored the caricature, noting the timing of its publication on International Holocaust Remembrance Day, according to a press release from the Prime Minister’s Office.

Earlier on Monday, Public Diplomacy and Diaspora Affairs Minister Yuli Edelstein told Army Radio that the government would probably refrain from filing an official complaint with the London-based paper. However, he said, “We will think about how to act against the paper’s representative here in Israel.”

The cartoon is “certainly” anti-Semitic, Edelstein asserted. “I don’t think there is any other possible way to interpret it,” he said, adding that its publication on International Holocaust Remembrance Day was particularly hurtful, a sentiment shared by Taub.

Responding to an outcry from Jewish groups — Efraim Zuroff, director of the Simon Wiesenthal Center’s Israel office, called the cartoon “absolutely disgusting” and said it “makes all the talk of fighting anti-Semitism seem irrelevant,” and Michael Salberg of the Anti-Defamation League said “The Sunday Times has clearly lost its moral bearings — a spokesman for the newspaper told The Times of Israel Sunday the cartoon was not anti-Semitic but critical of the prime minister’s policies, as it was “aimed squarely at Mr. Netanyahu and his policies, not at Israel, let alone at Jewish people.”

Knesset Speaker Reuven Rivlin wrote a letter Monday to his British counterpart, Speaker of the House of Commons John Bercow, expressing the Israeli people’s “extreme outrage” at the cartoon, which was drawn by veteran caricaturist Gerald Scarfe.

“For me and for other Israelis, this cartoon was reminiscent of the vicious journalism during one of the darkest periods in human history,” Rivlin wrote. While government authorities should not attempt to control the media and must grant freedom of speech, many Israelis are “shocked that such cartoons can be published in such a respectable newspaper in the Great Britain of today, fearing that such an event is testimony to sick undercurrents in British society.”

Scarfe’s cartoon, captioned “Israeli elections: Will cementing peace continue?”, “blatantly crossed the line of freedom of expression,” Rivlin added.

Jewish Agency chairman Natan Sharansky drew a direct connection between the cartoon and the increase in anti-Semitic violence that took place in 2012.

“There is a very tragic alliance between primitive, anti-democratic, nationalist, racist, fundamentalist forces who are committing most of the violence, and enlightened, liberal, intellectual representatives of the intelligentsia in Europe,” Sharansky told The Times of Israel. By using clear double standards towards Israel, Western intellectuals evidently accept the delegitimization of Israel and are thus “helping to justify” anti-Jewish violence, he said. While Israel respects other nations’ right to freedom of speech, it is was “necessary and important” to label people such as Scarfe, the cartoonist, as anti-Semites, he added.

Some Israelis came to Scarfe’s defense. Haaretz correspondent Anshel Pfeffer listed several reasons the cartoon was “not anti-Semitic by any standard”: the cartoon, he argued, isn’t directed at Jews, features no Jewish symbols and does not use Holocaust imagery.

Rupert Murdoch, the billionaire CEO of News Corp., which owns The Times, nevertheless tweeted a harshly worded apology.

Gerald Scarfe has never reflected the opinions of the Sunday Times. Nevertheless, we owe major apology for grotesque, offensive cartoon.

Nissim “Nusko” Hezkiyahu, one of Israel’s most famous caricaturists, defended Scarfe. While Sunday’s cartoon turned his stomach, it is not anti-Semitic, Hezkiyahu told Army Radio. “You need to know this man. He wasn’t born yesterday nor did he start publishing caricatures yesterday,” Hezkiyahu said. “We’re talking about Gerald Scarfe, one of the world’s most famous caricaturists, who doesn’t just make fun of Bibi” but of many politicians, and he treats them all equally disrespectfully. “If you look at the other caricatures, Bibi came off easy.”

“To say that this caricature shows Bibi with a big nose — compared to all the caricatures that are published here, I think that was the smallest nose he ever had,” Hezkiyahu said.

The fact that the cartoon was published on a day on which the world remembers the Holocaust was unfortunate, but most likely not the fault of the cartoonist but of the editor, Hezkiyahu added.

Taub, Israel’s ambassador in London, acknowledged that Scarfe is famous for politically incorrect drawings but said that the depiction of Netanyahu went too far. “Scarfe is known to be provocative, but I think that even according to his own provocative standards, this is a cartoon that crosses any line,” Taub said. “What is very troubling is that fact that these are things that we have become accustomed to see only really only at the extreme end of society, the most extreme elements on the fringes. And to see them in a respected newspaper like the Sunday Times, which is really in the heart of mainstream, is very troubling indeed.”

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One Response

  1. Serf says:

    The British media would soon ban all anti Islam and anti Muslim comments if the puppet states in the Middle East cancelled their nation’s trade, business, investment and property deals over the raging rabid and insane anti Muslim comments as published and broadcast especially in the comments section of all British newspapers.

    The media would also be in meltdown if the British public became fully aware of the hatred felt against the White British working class by some of the people who claim to follow the Talmud and claim victimhood.

    Many comments in British newspapers and broadcast media would be called racist if the newspapers and broadcast media replaced the word Muslim with Jew and changed Islam to Judaism. However it suits the ruling elite to demonise immigrants, Islam, Muslims and anyone with brown or black skin because it’s the only way to justify the savagery and genocide that the US, UK, EU and NATO have committed and continue to commit in the Middle East to secure the existence Greater Israel by the use of ISIS.

    http://www.globalresearch.ca/greater-israel-the-zionist-plan-for-the-middle-east/5324815

    Meanwhile Israel wants more power, resources and land and wants full control Patagonia in South America.

    http://www.rense.com/general95/pata.htm

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