Mark Zuckerberg caught on video asking filmmaker to stop recording as he is asked questions about privacy standards

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Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg, who has regularly been criticized over his website’s privacy settings, has had the tables turned on him in a documentary about online privacy.

When the social network’s founder was approached by a film crew outside his California home, he asked not to be filmed, but unbeknown to him the filmmaker continued to record their encounter using a camera hidden in his glasses.

The encounter was part of Cullen Hoback’s documentary Terms and Conditions May Apply, which examines internet privacy.

Mark Zuckerberg caught on video asking filmmaker to stop recording as he is asked questions about privacy standards

Privacy settings: Mark Zuckerberg asked not to be filmed when the documentary crew questioned him outside his home

‘Do you still think privacy is dead? What are your real thoughts on privacy?’ director Mr Hoback asked Mr Zuckerberg outside his home.

In the clip Mr Zuckerberg, 29, asked: ‘Are you guys recording?’ Will you please not?’ before relaxing after seeing that the main camera had been switched off, according to the Huffington Post.

After believing that he was no longer being filmed, Mr Zuckerberg suggested that the film crew got in contact with his company’s public relations department.

 

Mr Hoback, whose recently released documentary has been well received in the wake of the NSA scandal and revelations that the government had collected information on millions of Americans, said he had wanted Mr Zuckerberg to experience privacy infringement.

‘I just wanted him to say, “Look, I don’t want you to record me”, and I wanted to say, “Look, I don’t want you to record us”.’ Mr Hoback said.

Mr Zuckerberg has changed Facebook’s terms and conditions on several occasions. Most recently, the network began rolling out its Graph Search, making it even easier for people to find information and photos of the site.

Denied access: Leigh Van Bryan, left, was denied entry to the U.S. because of a tweet he sentDenied access: Leigh Van Bryan, left, was denied entry to the U.S. because of a tweet he sent

Timing: Cullen Hoback's documentary has been well received in the wake of the NSA scandalTiming: Cullen Hoback’s documentary has been well received in the wake of the NSA scandal

The new service has been labelled a privacy nightmare by Slate, which warned that ‘likes’ from several years ago could now be easily viewed by others.

Mr Zuckerberg has also been criticized in the past after he referred to web users as ‘dumb f***s’ for trusting him with their information, in an instant-message conversation when he was 19, the Huffington Post reported.

However, Facebook remains the largest social network in the world, with more than 1 billion users each month.

Terms and Conditions May Apply official trailer

 

In Terms and Conditions, Mr Hoback examined the agreements web users have been asked to sign up to by social network sites and other online services, and looked at who was sharing and collecting the information.

The film includes interviews with people who found themselves in trouble with the law after posting comments on Twitter that were taken out of context by authorities.

In one case, tourist Leigh Van Bryan was held by passport control at Los Angeles airport and then refused entry to the U.S. in January 2012 because of a tweet he sent three weeks early to a friend that said: ‘Free this week for a gossip/prep before I go and destroy America?’

Privacy act: Mark Zuckerberg's Facebook has faced criticism over its privacy settingsPrivacy act: Mark Zuckerberg’s Facebook has faced criticism over its privacy settings

‘I think the craziest thing about this whole experience is that I didn’t realize I was making a horror film,’ Mr Hoback told the Daily Telegraph, adding that it would take the typical internet user about 180 hours to read all of the terms and conditions for their favorite websites.

In the film, a MIT professor of social studies claimed that the world had woken up to privacy concerns about four years too late, according to the Chicago Tribune.

Mr Hoback told the paper: ‘I think the primary question needs to be not even do the systems work – but is this a mass infringement on civil liberties?’

The film opened July 12 and is being shown in various U.S. cinemas.

Source: Dailymail
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2 Responses

  1. Amanda says:

    It’s Facebook! Of course it’s not private! Just like anything else on the net, if you don’t want others to know don’t put it on there! Hackers etc have always been around that’s why so many don’t use credit cards on the net so why wouldn’t those in higher authority or with better access be able to view your info?!?! I use my credit card on the net but if it wasnt close to maxed out each time I use it I would think twice. Just like I don’t have my
    Mobile number or address available on Facebook. If you have something to hide (from anyone) it’s best not to post it on a pubic page! Simple.

  2. 5 War Veteran says:

    Of course Zionberg does not want to go on record regarding the truth.

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